Check Back Next Week!

I’ve been busy editing this week, because the 24th is only 8 days away! If you don’t remember, I announced last month that I would be putting out a short story on the 24th of June.  That story is titled The King, The Advisor & The Peasant. 

This short story is 6 pages long, and will be available for free. It’s also dedicated to one of my patreon supporters.

The King, The Advisor & The Peasant is a humorous story, following a peasant through an audience with a King who may or may not be a donkey. It’s also my first attempt at satire.

Thanks, as always, for reading!  And don’t forget to check out my Patreon! All of my stories come out to Patreon supporters first.

Strange The Dreamer – Laini Taylor

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Goodreads Synopsis: The dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he’s been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance or lose his dream forever.

What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving?

The answers await in Weep, but so do more mysteries—including the blue-skinned goddess who appears in Lazlo’s dreams. How did he dream her before he knew she existed? And if all the gods are dead, why does she seem so real?

Welcome to Weep.

Find on Goodreads and Amazon. 

I’d read the other series, Daughter of Smoke and Bone, by Laini Taylor last year. So I was fairly interested when I heard that she’d published another book. Plus I fell in love with the cover.

Strange the Dreamer is much better than Laini Taylor’s first series. You can tell right away that her storytelling and prose has matured, which made me happy. It’s so cool when you can tell that an author is growing and becoming better, it gives me hope for my own writing. 😀   There were still times when I felt her prose in this book went a little overboard, I caught myself having to read paragraphs twice before I understood what was going on. It was just all so flowery.  However the upside to the prose style is a very vivid world.

The world of Strange the Dreamer is fricken gorgeous. From fair blue maidens, to libraries that you wish you could go live in, from dream moths to ghosts. This world is amazing.

The characters are also well written, though I disliked some of them, I can’t complain that this was because of lack of development or poor writing. It was just a matter of the character being annoying in my mind. The character I’m talking about is Sarai, the other main character and eventual love interest.   Sarai is a good girl, too good. She takes care of her godling siblings/friends and doesn’t complain. She knows her family was slaughtered by humans but doesn’t want revenge. She was so boringly good, it frustrated me. I didn’t understand her lack of anger.  I felt that there was nowhere for her character to go, she was already perfect.

Speaking of anger, I loved Minya.  I want to read a book from her perspective. As a small child she is the one who rescues the other godlings, dragging them to safety when she was only 6!  She saw her family and friends murdered brutally and she wants revenge. I could understand that, I wanted to see her anger, to see her taste revenge and I wanted to see her be able to move beyond that eventually. A redemption arc I guess.

The main character, Lazlo was fantastic. I appreciated that he doesn’t get what he wants immediately, I like it that he has to work long and hard to reach his dream.  I disliked the romance between him and Sarai, it felt forced and I didn’t think they had chemistry. I honestly thought Lazlo was gay for quite awhile. Which would have been better in my opinion, but whatever.  I do however, liked the way the story ended. I won’t give spoilers, but I will say it will leave wanting to read the next book very badly.

Overall I really liked this book. Strange the Dreamer is a fantastic fantasy story, it has a stunning world and interesting characters. Four stars.

OwlCrate Unboxing

OwlCrate is a YA book subscription box that I’ve been getting for several months now, and I absolutely love it! So today I’m going to do an unboxing post.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The theme of May’s box was Comic Explosion. So everything in the book themed around comics and it was really fun. This box came with all sorts of goodies including coffee candy from Kafe Candy, an exclusive look at Image Comics’ new series AFAR  and more below!

This month came with a zipper pull, which I accidentally put on my key chain first because I didn’t realize what it was.

There was also a cool pen, which you can see featured in the middle of my comic collection (only part of it!) and in the middle of one of AFAR’s pages. Btw I really liked the first chapter of this comic and I plan on eventually buying it.

I also got a Wonder Woman Candle, which was made by Dio Candle Company. Candles are my favorite thing to get and this one smells amazing!

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Also in this box were various different Funko Pops, I got Deadpool. 😀

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And then last but never least, the book with this box was Eliza and her Monsters by  Francesca Zappia.  I’ve already read it and I’ll be posting a review soon!

So what’d you think? Should I do a monthly post about the OwlCrate boxes?

The Aldar Dominion – by Katherine Bogle

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A new book has just come out from the publishing collective I work for! The Aldar Dominion by Katherine Bogle is currently on sale for $0.99.

Synopsis:  The Aldar Dominion saved the world. Then they damned it.

After solar flares decimated Earth’s population, the alien corporation gave humans a recipe for immortality and hope for the next generation. Cloning and the technology to transport consciousness from one body to another saved the human race from extinction. But the value of human life plummeted.

In an age when animal conservation no longer exists, Selene smuggles animals to safety. While fleeing Dominion drones during a mission gone wrong, Selene suffers a debilitating head injury. The pain unlocks memories from twenty lost years: stark labs and human experiments. These nightmares could hold the key to why natural-born human children are disappearing. But worse—they reveal a sinister plot centuries in the making.

Can Selene decipher her dreams in time to avoid enslavement to the aliens? Or will she witness the end of the human race?

Read the first book in the Dominion Rising series to find out!

Find The Aldar Dominion on: Amazon, Kobo, Ibooks, or Barnes and Noble.

Don’t forget to check out the Patchwork Press website as well, and stay tuned for more releases to come!

Light in August – By William Faulkner

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Goodreads Synopsis: Light in August, a novel that contrasts stark tragedy with hopeful perseverance in the face of mortality, features some of Faulkner’s most memorable characters: guileless, dauntless Lena Grove, in search of the father of her unborn child; Reverend Gail Hightower, a lonely outcast haunted by visions of Confederate glory; and Joe Christmas, a desperate, enigmatic drifter consumed by his mixed ancestry.

Find on Goodreads and Amazon.

Again, I decided to read this because I’ve been on a classic literature binge.  This one is probably my favorite of my recent classic reads. Light in August is a haunting story. From Lena to Hightower to Christmas, each character has a past that makes their life difficult and each is struggling for something else in life.    This book is a fast read, and I should warn you does not have a very happy ending.  Lena finds the man who got her pregnant but he’s not what she thought.  Christmas gets into trouble with the law.  Only Hightower doesn’t have some catastrophe fall on him.   But I would definitely recommenced reading this book. It’s a book that looks into the heart of man, it shows people for what they are and how circumstance forces them to do things they wouldn’t otherwise do.

After reading this book I’m excited to read more by William Faulkner.  His writing was very impressive, and his characters deep.  Does anyone have any recommendations for more books by him?

In the end I gave this book 3.5 stars on Goodreads.

An American Tragedy – Theodore Dreiser

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Goodreads Synopsis: A tremendous bestseller when it was published in 1925, “An American Tragedy” is the culmination of Theodore Dreiser’s elementally powerful fictional art. Taking as his point of departure a notorious murder case of 1910, Dreiser immersed himself in the social background of the crime to produce a book that is both a remarkable work of reportage and a monumental study of character. Few novels have undertaken to track so relentlessly the process by which an ordinary young man becomes capable of committing a ruthless murder, and the further process by which social and political forces come into play after his arrest.
In Clyde Griffiths, the impoverished, restless offspring of a family of street preachers, Dreiser created an unforgettable portrait of a man whose circumstances and dreams of self-betterment conspire to pull him toward an act of unforgivable violence. Around Clyde, Dreiser builds an extraordinarily detailed fictional portrait of early twentieth-century America, its religious and sexual hypocrisies, its economic pressures, its political corruption. The sheer prophetic amplitude of his bitter truth-telling, in idiosyncratic prose of uncanny expressive power, continues to mark Dreiser as a crucially important American writer. “An American Tragedy,” the great achievement of his later years, is a work of mythic force, at once brutal and heartbreaking.

Find on Amazon and Goodreads. 

This was quite the read! An American Tragedy is not only a long book it’s also a very deep book. There were times I wanted to stop reading because of the verbose prose, but the intriguing main character made me stick with it.

The story follows Clyde Griffiths, the son of missionary parents, a young boy who longs for a better life than the poverty that he was raised in.  Clyde isn’t a selfish person in the beginning, he’s just a person trying to decide how to get through life. After his sister runs away in her teenage years, Clyde begins to look more critically at his life and tries to takes steps to change his circumstance.  We see Clyde go from odd job to odd job, and then finally taking a job in a hotel where he finds a good position, for awhile anyway. In the hotel he gets mixed up in a group of stupid selfish boys who only care about getting into questionable fun. From there thing just go downhill, and an accident forces Clyde to go on the run and leave the state.  When the story picks up again he’s now in his twenties and working for a rich uncle in a factory. There he meets a beautiful girl with whom he starts a relationship with, and again things go south.

Dreiser creates a very vivid story, and you feel sympathy for Clyde even when you don’t like what he’s doing.  Clyde is a coward and a selfish person. But you wonder what he could have been if circumstances were different.  Like I said earlier there are times that the writing gets a bit dense. My copy of the book was 972 pages, which was a bit much, even for me. Still I couldn’t help wanting to know what would happen in the end of this tragic story.

In the end I gave this book 3.5 stars on Goodreads.